Temperatures to plummet as Sylvan Lake and Eckville head into the weekend

The area is expected to see daytime high of around -30C this weekend and into next week

Break out the heavy sweaters, parkas and toques because the mild winter Central Alberta has been blessed with so far will soon be ending.

The Weather Network is warning that cold temperatures and snow is expected by the weekend.

By the end of the week, the day time high is predicted to be somewhere in the mid to high-teens, with a windchill in the low twenties.

Over the weekend, The Weather Network is predicting it will feel closer to -30C during the day.

It is expected snowfall will precede the extreme cold expected over the weekend and into next week.

“A low pressure system will begin to push snow into Alberta Tuesday, from south to north… Snow will continue Wednesday across Central Alberta and then spread east into central, southern Saskatchewan and Manitoba…” The Weather Network said.

“At this time, there is some uncertainty where the heaviest snowfall will occur. One model indicates it will occur in central Alberta and Saskatchewan…”

As of publishing, Environment Canada has no warnings in Place for Sylvan Lake and surrounding areas.

Extreme cold and snowfall warnings have been issued by Environment Canada for areas to the north and through the mountains, such as Banff and Jasper Nations Parks.

“By next week, a deep freeze will engulf the Prairies – with daytime highs expected to approach the -30sC across the Prairies and wind chills making it feel like -40C in some central and northern areas,” The Weather Network said.

With these cold temperatures expected, it is important to remember to bundle up before heading outside to reduce the risk of weather-related ailments.

Frostbite occurs when the skin is exposed to freezing temperatures for too long, and the risk increases with extreme cold temperatures.

“Frostbite is most likely to occur on the feet, hands, ears, nose, and face. Men may have frostbite of the genitals if they do not dress properly,” Alberta Health Services says.

The risk of hypothermia also increases when the temperatures plummet and people are not dresses for the appropriate weather.

“Often a hiker or skier’s body temperature will drop really low before others notice that something is wrong. If someone begins to shiver violently, stumble, or can’t respond to questions, it may be hypothermia and you need to warm him or her quickly,” the myhealth.alberta.ca website states.

Be sure to check the weather and road conditions before leaving home, and to dress appropriately for the snow and cold expected throughout the region.

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