File Photo.

RCMP constable explains policy for injured roadside animals

Const. Mike Hibbs explains what policy says to do if an officer comes across an injured animal

RCMP has a generic protocol when it comes to injured animals on the roads or highways.

Const. Mike Hibbs, RCMP spokesperson, said the first thing they do is make contact with conservation or the humane society.

“If neither one of those people are available to come out then we destroy the animal,” said Hibbs.

“Depending on where we are or how far out we are say, on a highway or something like that, I mean, if the animal is suffering and it’s going to take an hour and a half or two hours for a wildlife officer to arrive then sometimes it’s best for us to destroy the animal before they get there,” added Hibbs. “For the most part we’ll make contact with conservation before we make any decisions.”

The size of the animal will determine whether the officer will use their side arm or a rifle.

“For example, a deer could be euthanized with our handgun and a moose we’d need a rifle,” said Hibbs.

Afterward the RCMP officer will move the animal, if they can, to the side of the road and then they will call highway maintenance to come and clean up the animal.

“That’s basically our policy,” Hibbs added.

A video surfaced of a police officer in Lethbridge running over an injured deer with his service vehicle several times while it was still alive.

READ MORE: Video of Alberta police officer running over wounded deer sparks outrage

Lethbridge police have said the officer was trying to euthanize the animal with his truck on Jan. 5.

Alberta Serious Incident Response Team (ASIRT), Alberta Fish and Wildlife and the Alberta SPCA is reviewing what happened.

with files from the Canadian Press


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