The Canada Revenue Agency headquarters in Ottawa is shown on November 4, 2011. A federal program designed to help low-income Canadians file their taxes has seen an increase in the number of returns in the year after it received a boost in funding. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

The Canada Revenue Agency headquarters in Ottawa is shown on November 4, 2011. A federal program designed to help low-income Canadians file their taxes has seen an increase in the number of returns in the year after it received a boost in funding. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Canada Revenue Agency’s tax call centres get a D on business group’s report card

Nearly half the 200 test calls couldn’t be completed

The federal government’s tax information call centres have received a D grade on a new report card from the Canadian Federation of Independent Business.

The group says overall quality of service was lower and wait times were longer than in previous analysis of the Canada Revenue Agency’s call centres, although callers no longer encountered busy signals.

It found 49 per cent of the 200 test calls made by CFIB employees in June 2019 couldn’t be completed due to excessive wait times, blocked calls or disconnects.

That’s up from 30 per cent of calls that couldn’t be completed in a 2016 test and only 20 per cent that couldn’t be completed in 2012.

The CFIB also says CRA agents provided incomplete or incorrect information in 41 per cent of the cases where its callers received an answer, compared with 31 per cent in the 2016 report card and 24 per cent in 2012.

Canada Revenue Agency says it’s already working on improvements, such as providing an estimated wait time to speak with a senior agent and a feature that allows callers to keep their priority without staying on hold.

“We are also making continuous improvements to our web content, and will soon introduce a chatbot to help make it easier for Canadians to find information online,” CRA spokesman Etienne Biram said in an emailed statement.

“These are just first steps. We know there is more work to be done, and we are taking steps to better meet Canadians’ needs.”

CFIB says its staff posed questions based on four typical business scenarios, such as a consulting company asking how to apply goods and services tax if it operates across the country.

ALSO READ: Service Canada told key to improving use, ease of online services is human touch

The GST question, which has been posed in previous CFIB tests, was answered incompletely 30 per cent of the time and incorrectly 23 per cent of the time — resulting in callers receiving acceptable answers only 47 per cent of the time.

Another repeat question about applying employment insurance premiums received no erroneous answers and was answered completely 51 per cent of the time and “above and beyond” in 13 per cent of the cases.

The other two scenarios were new additions to the 2019 analysis, one about capital cost allowances (answered acceptably 50 per cent of the time) and another about car allowances (answered acceptably 81 per cent of the time.)

Regarding time required to get answers, the CFIB said that front-line agents connected with English-speaking callers within 30 minutes in 98 per cent of the cases — an improvement from 64 per cent during the 2016 test.

However, the CFIB says that the employment insurance and capital cost allowance questions could only be answered by a senior agent, and the average wait time for a transferred call was 59 minutes.

The business group recommends that the CRA train frontline agents to answer a larger percentage of complex questions, so that fewer calls have to go to a senior agent, and additional senior agents to reduce wait times.

Corinne Pohlmann, CFIB’s senior vice-president of national affairs, says small business owners rely heavily on CRA to give them the answers they need to be compliant with the law.

“They don’t just deal with CRA once a year. They deal with them constantly … .and they rely on the CRA to provide them with the answers they need, when they need them,” Pohlmann says.

ALSO READ: New caller ID verification program expected to protect Canadians from ‘spoof’ calls

Pohlmann says the business owners are also in a vulnerable position during an audit if the CRA call centre provides incorrect information or if the error is made by an accountant or book keeper hired by the company.

She says one tool that provides some protection is the CRA’s My Business Account online portal, which commits to respond electronically in writing within 10 business days.

If the agency’s information is later found to be incorrect in an audit and there’s written evidence that the business did its due diligence, then the CRA won’t impose penalties.

“It’s the only avenue that gives some accountability to the CRA and allows the business owner some protection,” Pohlmann says.

David Paddon, The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

The external wall of the Bentley Post Office was destroyed when a semi drove into the building, resulting is an estimated $50,000 in damages. (Photo Submitted)
Sylvan Lake RCMP lay charges in post office destruction

One suspect is in custody the second suspect has a warrant for his arrest

Alberta chief medical officer of health Dr. Deena Hinshaw said the province still hopes to bring the hospitalization number down before relaxing restrictions. (photography by Chris Schwarz/Government of Alberta)
14 new deaths, 366 new COVID-19 cases in Alberta

Province nearing 100K COVID-19 vaccine doses administered

The first pages of the book, by Kristy Walker.
Sylvan Lake author pens first children’s book about COVID-19

“The Coronavirus Isn’t Scary” by Kristy Walker teaches children to take care of themselves

Minister of Agriculture and Forestry, MLA Innisfail-Sylvan Lake, Devin Dreeshen. (Photo Submitted)
Ag Minister announces 20% off crop insurance for Alberta farmers

Dreeshen says this will support job creators and boosting rural economy during a difficult time

Terrance Josephson of the Princeton Posse, at left, and Tyson Conroy of the Summerland Steam clash during a Junior B hockey game at the Summerland Arena in the early spring of 2020. (John Arendt - Summerland Review)
QUIZ: How much do you know about hockey?

Test your knowledge of Canada’s national winter sport

A lone passenger stands outside the International Arrivals area at Pearson Airport in Toronto on Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2021. As the federal government prepares to slap new restrictions on foreign arrivals, Health Canada data suggest a growing number of infections directly connected to international travel. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn
Holiday season vacations coincide with rise in COVID-19 travel-related cases

Between Nov. 30 and Dec. 27, 86,953 people flew into Canada from the United States

Gov.Gen Julie Payette walks in the chamber after greeting Senators before delivering the Speech from the Throne, at the Senate of Canada Building in Ottawa, on Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
Report details yelling, screaming and aggressive conduct at Rideau Hall under Payette

Report says employees did not feel they had a place to go with their complaints

Mom’s Diner owner Wesley Langlois has joined a growing number of Alberta restaurants that are allowing sit-in dining despite public health restrictions. Photo by PAUL COWLEY/Advocate staff
Red Deer diner joins sit-down dining protest

Mom’s Diner has joined a growing list of Alberta restaurants flouting health restrictions

Young hockey players were out on Bentley Tuesday for a march to a support a return to sports. (Photo courtesy of Bobby McKinlay)
(Kraft Dinner/Twitter)
Kraft Dinner launches candy-flavoured mac and cheese just in time for Valentine’s Day

Sweet and cheesy treat will be here just in time for the cheesiest holiday of the year

In this undated image made from a video taken by the Duke of Sussex and posted on @SaveChildrenUK by the Duke of Sussex and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, shows the Duchess of Sussex reading the book “Duck! Rabbit!” to their son Archie who celebrates his first birthday on Wednesday May 6, 2020. The Canadian Paediatric Society is reminding families that the process of raising a reader starts from birth. (Duke of Sussex/@SaveChildrenUK)
Canadian Paediatric Society says raising a reader starts from birth

CPS says literacy is one of the strongest predictors of lifelong health outcomes

Employment, Workforce Development and Disability Inclusion Minister Carla Qualtrough responds to a question during a news conference Thursday August 20, 2020 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Easing rules for parental benefits created inequities among parents, documents say

Employment Minister Carla Qualtrough’s office says the government will make any necessary changes

People walk along a pedestrianized zone of Sainte-Catherine street in Montreal, Monday, May 18, 2020, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues in Canada and around the world. Newly released statistics point to a major drop in police-recorded crime during the first eight months of the COVID-19 pandemic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes
Crime down in first 8 months of pandemic, but mental health calls rise: StatCan

The agency says violent crimes such as assault dropped significantly

Most Read